Tuscaloosa honors veterans in two ceremonies

Tuscaloosa honors veterans in two ceremonies

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Bagpipes were part of the Veterans Day ceremony at the Tuscaloosa VA Medical Center. Source: WBRC video Bagpipes were part of the Veterans Day ceremony at the Tuscaloosa VA Medical Center. Source: WBRC video
William Davis served in the 82nd Airborne in World War II. Source: WBRC video William Davis served in the 82nd Airborne in World War II. Source: WBRC video
National Guardsman David Scott re-enlisted for another seven years at the end of a Veterans Day program at the University of Alabama.  Source: WBRC video National Guardsman David Scott re-enlisted for another seven years at the end of a Veterans Day program at the University of Alabama. Source: WBRC video
Staff Sgt. Jeff Munford gave the keynote speech at the Tuscaloosa VA Medical Center ceremony. Source: WBRC video Staff Sgt. Jeff Munford gave the keynote speech at the Tuscaloosa VA Medical Center ceremony. Source: WBRC video
TUSCALOOSA, AL (WBRC) -

You could almost hear the sound of bagpipes blowing all the way from the University of Alabama campus to the Tuscaloosa's VA Medical Center. Those were two of several Veterans Day programs held in the city today.

At the medical center, members of Holt High Schools ROTC program stood alongside veterans who served in World War II and others in a mid-day ceremony.

William Davis, who served in the 82nd Airborne simply answered, "It means the difference between slavery and freedom," when asked what Veteran's Day meant to him. He was one of more than a hundred who attended the VA program.

Staff Sgt. Jeff Munford, who gave the keynote speech, says he wanted people to recognize the sacrifices made by former and current veterans.

"I just wanted to convey and let them know that there is a price to be paid as being a veteran. There is a price to be paid in just being a service member in general," Munford said.

On the University of Alabama campus, the school's new Military Affairs Office held it's Veterans Day ceremony. National Guardsman David Scott closed out that program by re-enlisting for another seven years.

"I believe that the national guard allows me to serve my country and to do something much larger than myself, for my country, my state and my community," Scott said.

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