Study: More hospitals reduce early elective births

Study: More hospitals reduce early elective births

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BIRMINGHAM, AL (WBRC) -

A new study shows more hospitals are saying "no" to elective early births.

A study involving 25 hospitals in five of the United States largest states shows a dramatic drop in elective early births, which involves women seeking C-sections or induced births.

The Alabama Director of the March of Dimes, Camille Epps, welcomed the news.

"Those last few weeks are crucial for brain development and their lungs and there are so many other things going on as the baby is progressing that every day does make a difference in their lives in terms of health," Epps said.

The chief reason for the decline was the hospitals implementing a new policy against early births unless for medical reasons.

"Once the hospital and its staff hear the results how they can decide their deliveries, it's almost a no-brainer," Rosemary Blackmon with the Alabama Hospital Association said.

There is also a cost factor if a child is born before 39 weeks there is a potential for greater costs for health care.

"We know moms have a lot on their plate when it comes to having a baby. It's a stresful time. We want to them to go in with the knowledge it will be a win for their babies health," Epps said.

Most of the hospitals in Alabama are following the policy. The state is leading the way for other states.

To see the study's results go to www.marchofdimes.com.

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