Trinity Hospital wins battle in move to Highway 280

Trinity Hospital wins battle in move to Highway 280

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After Friday's ruling, Trinity can move forward with construction at the 280 location. Source: WBRC video After Friday's ruling, Trinity can move forward with construction at the 280 location. Source: WBRC video
BIRMINGHAM, AL (WBRC) -

The long fight over Trinity Hospital moving to Highway 280 is settled.

Friday, the Alabama Supreme Court ruled in favor of Trinity after a four-year legal battle. Justices denied requests by Brookwood Medical Center and St. Vincent's Hospital to consider further arguments against Trinity's relocation.

This "unappealable" ruling affirms a November 2012 ruling by the Alabama Court of Civil Appeals. Brookwood and St. Vincent's have long contested the Certificate of Need required by Trinity to move. They have also argued that the relocation will hurt them financially.

Trinity Medical Center President and Chief Executive Officer Keith Granger released this statement:

"This is the green light we have awaited for more than four years. We are absolutely elated with this outcome and look forward to bringing enhanced access to healthcare to our community – along with thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in economic impact."

As many who have followed this issue know, there are several issues at stake in the move.

Trinity says that the move isn't just about providing care but firing up the economic engine. The two-year construction phase to complete the hospital will generate at least 4,000 jobs and generate more than $3.1 million in city and county tax revenues. The hospital also has a 15-year development plan to not only finish their facility, but add parking decks, hotels, office buildings and retail space.

Many residents wonder how Highway 280 can accomodate additional traffic generated by the hospital. The Crestwood community is also concerned about finding care once the hospital relocates and determining out what will happen to the current Trinity campus once the hospital relocates.

Robert Walker, President of East Lake Community and vice president of Wahouma neighborhood, released this statement on the ruling:

"The court's decision is disappointing and devastating to the neighborhoods currently served by Trinity Medical Center. But even more devastating is the city of Birmingham's role in assisting Trinity's move to a location that will primarily serve affluent North Shelby County. It's bad enough for Trinity to turn its back on Birmingham's poor people. But it really hurts for the city to pay Trinity incentives to do it.

As I have in the past, I respectfully ask Birmingham leaders to reconsider using our tax dollars in this outrageous manner."

FOX6 News will continue to follow this story Friday so check back for answers to these issues tonight at 6 and 9.

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