Regions Tradition means business boom on 280

Regions Tradition means business boom on 280

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Employees at Dixie Fish Co. say they have already noticed a bump in business due to the golf tournament. Source: WBRC video Employees at Dixie Fish Co. say they have already noticed a bump in business due to the golf tournament. Source: WBRC video
Lloyd's is another popular restaurant among people in town for the Regions Tradition. Source: WBRC video Lloyd's is another popular restaurant among people in town for the Regions Tradition. Source: WBRC video
BIRMINGHAM, AL (WBRC) -

The Regions Tradition Golf Tournament means an increase in people and traffic on U.S. 280. Businesses along the highway welcome additional customers.

"We can already tell there is a bump in business. We can see not only people coming in, [but also] guys participating in the tournament. We had a couple of guys in last night," Mason Jambon with the Dixie Fish Company said.

Dixie Fish opened back in September. Jambon realized then the importance of the golf tournament.

The seafood restaurant teamed up with the Bruno's Event Team to provide catered meals Sunday to the scores of volunteers at the tournament.

It's a similar scene down the road at Lloyd's Restaurant which has been a tradition of its own on 280 for years.

"It's the same for us year in and year out. Onion rings, hamburger steak. It's a traditional place," George Grammas of Lloyd's said.

Regions Tradition visitors make their way to Lloyd's to enjoy that menu. Grammas said at times the golf tournament may scare off some of their regular customers.

"One thing that happens is people's perception [of a] lot of traffic on 280, and really, they handle it so well it's never a problem at all," Grammas said.

Grammas expects visitors will make up some of the loss this week.

Meanwhile, the golf event brings in a lot of people looking for a place to stay. The Marriot Hotel expects to see a 20 percent jump in business.

All of these businesses believe these golf lovers will have money to spend.

"Obviously the clientel that frequent golf events have a little bit more disposal income. We are hoping to let some of them dispose of it here at Dixie Fish," Jambon said.

The Greater Birmingham Visitors and Convention Bureau estimates over the last three years the tournament has meant about a $54 million economic impact on the area.

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