Latino Memphis reaches out to displaced flood victims

Latino Memphis reaches out to displaced flood victims

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Latino Memphis staff members say residents like Barretto, whose homes are condemned and full of mildew, aren't getting the help they need. (Photo Source: WMC Action News 5) Latino Memphis staff members say residents like Barretto, whose homes are condemned and full of mildew, aren't getting the help they need. (Photo Source: WMC Action News 5)
MEMPHIS, TN -

(WMC) - WMC Action News 5 has been monitoring the plight of at least one dozen Mid-South flooding victims who are struggling to recover after losing everything when flood waters rushed into their Whitehaven community last Sunday.

On Saturday, July 5, a Mid-South civil rights organization stepped in to help residents of the Wheel Estate community.

Latino Memphis invited flood victims to their office, located at 6041 Mt. Moriah Road, to listen to their needs and help them develop a flood recovery plan.

Maria Barretto told her story through an interpreter.

"I also wanted to get a little bit of clothing, but by the time I came back the water was so, had risen so high and so fast; it was not safe for us to get in," said Barretto.

Coincidentally, Barretto moved to the Whitehaven community after being flooded out of a mobile home property in Millington in 2010.

Latino Memphis staff members say residents like Barretto, whose homes are condemned and full of mildew, aren't getting the help they need. The Wheel Estate's property manager says he is trying to get temporary homes brought to Memphis until the necessary repairs can be made.

However, advocates for flood victims say that's not a long term solution. This is not the first time the Nonconnah Creek has flooded the property.

"I'm not an engineer so I don't know if the creek could be fixed or the containing wall has to be raised, but those properties need to be moved from that particular spot," said Latino Memphis' Maurico Calvo.

There are concerns that residents will be victimized again unless major corrective steps are taken.

Roughly 17 flood victims continue to live in a community center shelter managed by the Red Cross.

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